Sue @ Cadair View Lodge's Blog

Tales from a self catering holiday provider

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There’s a little village…

… well you could hardly call it a village… a group of houses on a hillside, near to Bala and every year (if not at any other time of year) it becomes famous for being lit up by a man named Gareth.

He lights his house in Rhyd Uchaf with Christmas lights in aid of charity.  It’s a wonderful surprise, a delight for both children and adults, to drive up the pitch black road towards the Village and to see the brightly coloured lights shining out.

The Village (signposted Rhyd Uchaf) is off the A4212 not far out of Bala (a left hand turn – more of a fork).  Keep on this road for a mile or so – you can’t miss it!  Although it is possible to get there via “B” roads from the Trawsfynydd direction it is easier, quicker and safer (in the dark) to drive towards Bala on the “A” road and then to turn.

Here are some photos from a couple of years ago.  There seems to be more lights (if that’s possible) every year and remember to leave a donation.  You’ll probably find Gareth wandering around, talking to visitors.  Also please remember that this is his home and his garden and respect it as such… and please park considerately.

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See more information about our accommodation at or send us an enquiry using the form below.

Hope to see you in Snowdonia soon.  Kindest regards Sue


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We’re Ready!

“Ready for what?” you ask?  Ready for our Christmas and New Year guests!

The christmas trees are up and decorated.  The Christmas wine (for those staying over Christmas Day or New Year’s Eve) has been delivered.  It’s all go, go, GO!

Nadolig Llawen a chi!  Merry Christmas to You!

See you on the “other” side in 2017!

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Let it snow!

Well my Christmas delivery of snow arrived early this year (usually it’s late – very late!) and took our guests a little by surprise.  The temperatures fell to -12 degrees but everybody said that they were warm and cosy in the cabins.

Here are a few of photos… there are more on Facebook and Instagram.

Doesn’t it look spectacular!

See what we offer all year around (except November) on our website


View from Caban Eryri December 2017 (


View from Cadair View Lodge December 2017 (


View from Ty Coed (


A Walk On Porthmadog Cob

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We recently took a walk over Porthmadog Cob – Y Cob Porthmadog.  Many of you will have driven it and looked out over the marshes but did you know that a few foot below that stone wall there is a fantastic pathway – cycleway?  This area was created when The Cob was widened several years ago and provides a fantastic place to watch the wildlife on the Glaslyn Marshes and to catch a glimpse of the Glaslyn Osprey fishing when they are in residence (March-ish to September-ish).  The big black wall on the other side of the road blanks out the spectacular view of the estuary, marshes and out to sea.

It is possible to walk across The Cob alongside the railway line but, of course, you must be very aware of trains passing quite close to you, keep control of children (who may be frightened by how close the trains are) and dogs.  Maybe check the train timetable and do this part of the walk between trains.  The Cob is about a mile each way.

We started our walk at the Boston Lodge end, crossing the road shortly after the old toll house and climbing the steps up to the railway level.  It’s quite obvious down on the ground.


Information at Boston Lodge end of The Cob


Looking back along the line to Boston Lodge yard and sheds



View across the tracks towards Portmeirion and Harlech

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Every walk needs cake.  Coffee + Walnut Cake at Spooner’s Cafe on Porthmadog Harbour Station.

The halfway point.  We crossed the road to Britannia Terrace and turned for home.  Drop down onto The Cob footpath and cycle way just after the HMRC office.  william-maddocks

Stop a moment and take a look at the carving of William Madocks, the man who built The Cob and who gave his name to so much locally.  Read more about him HERE

When there is no traffic passing on the road this is a beautifully peaceful walk.  We were surrounded by the sounds of birds (and waterfowl), wind and water.  If you do this walk savor these moments.  It was a rather grey day and the clouds were low otherwise we would’ve had a fantastic view of Cnicht (the Welsh Matterhorn – Google it and you’ll see why), The Moelwynion mountains and Snowdon plus its surrounding peaks.  This was the best that I could do.

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I mentioned the wildlife.  We thought that we’d spotted an otter but it was a log (isn’t it always) but there are otters in the area.  We did see several egret (stood for 5 minutes watching one fishing in a pool on the seaside of The Cob), lots of oyster catchers, curlew and geese.  Of course there were lots of birds which I’ll lump together as “seagulls” but an expert would give you more information I’m sure.  There are often swans and cormorants/shags on these marshes too.

This great “trailhead” greeted us as we approached the car.  Two miles done – mostly level.


To do this walk either park in the lay by on the Minffordd side of The Cob, near to the old toll house and Boston Lodge  – this is free but limited.  Alternatively, park in Porthmadog – there’s a big Pay and Display car park behind Wilko’s.  See a map of Porthmadog HERE

This walk is about 20 minutes drive from Cadair View Lodge log cabin accommodation in the Snowdonia National Park.  To enquire about availability, suitability of our accommodation or prices drop me a message using the form below.



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Frongoch… Birthplace of IRA?

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Not what you’d be expecting a holiday accommodation provider in Snowdonia to be talking about is it?  But it happened.

After the Easter Rising in 1916, around 1,800 people were transported from Ireland to a tiny village near to Bala.  Why there you may ask?  Well it seems that it was “out of the way” and there were already 2 established prisoner of war camps which had held German prisoners.  What it seems the authorities hadn’t realised (or realised the significance of) is that the area was a hotbed of Welsh nationalist feelings and behaviour.  These locals were working in the camps and the imprisoned Irish saw them as role models I suppose for what they could achieve.  The prisoners started to teach each other to speak Irish which made it more difficult for the prison authorities to understand what was going on.  It seems that they were allowed to “perform” dramas which involved drilling and military tactics.  When they returned to Ireland in the Christmas of 1916 as heroes they had formulated plans and I suppose they were what we’d call today radicalised.

Amongst the people at Frongoch were Michael Collins, a significant figure in the Irish Revolution and Sinn Féin founder, Arthur Griffith.


This plaque was until recently the only reminder of the Frongoch Camps.

Until recently all that remained as a reminder of what happened in this little village was a plaque in a layby.  Since the Centenary commemorations an interpretation board and flags have joined it.  Stand in the layby and look at the board with an aerial photo of the area and try to imagine where this huge camp (and the whisky distillery which was there too) stood… it’s very hard.  It happened – honest, but it’s very difficult to imagine it now.


Frongoch is on  A4212 between Bala and Trawsfynydd.  The plaque is in layby, on left hand side after the Village on way towards Trawsfynydd.

BBC mark 100 years since arrival of Easter Rising prisonners

This is about 20 minutes drive from Cadair View Lodge log cabin accommodation



The interpretation board showing where the camps where in relation to what can be seen at Frongoch today



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Adventure #1 – Year of Adventure

As many of you will know 2016 is The Year of Adventure in Wales.  We’re encouraged to #FindYourEpic and do something adventurous.  What does “adventure” mean to you?   According to the dictionary…

Def:  adventure meaning an unusual and exciting or daring experience

So what would you do that you’d class as an “adventure”?

My first adventure of the Year was on 4th March at Dylan’s Restaurant at Criccieth.  A restaurant doesn’t sound like much of an adventure does it?  I was invited to a briefing for local tourism businesses.  As part of the day we were treated to a sampler lunch of local produce… always worth attending these things – especially when they’re hosted by great restaurants.  As part of the lunch there was local seafood on offer.  Now I’ve tried lobster, shrimp and mussels before but there was also clams, crab and oysters available.  I’ve always fancied trying oysters – not because I particularly fancied the flavour but more for the challenge.  If I was faced with a plate of oysters could I cope?  I like to eat out and to try different things but I’m not a huge seafood fan.  I wouldn’t order oysters in a restaurant just in case I didn’t like them but this was a great opportunity to just try one and I knew, being as it was Dylans, that they’d be great quality AND be prepared properly.  So….

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Oyster There!

here it is… one oyster!  I squeezed a little lemon on to it… slid my knife under it to make sure that it was going to come out of the shell without a big fuss.  Had my napkin ready… just in case.  Closed my eyes… held the shell to my lips… tipped and swallowed.  No chewing was going to happen.

Oyster Empty

Oyster Gone!

A taste of lemon and of the sea!  Smashed it!  Thanks to Dylan’s for facilitating this experience.

First “adventure” down! Bring on the next!


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Earth Day 2016 @ Cadair View Lodge Ltd


April 22nd 2016 is #EarthDay.  You may’ve heard about it in the media but what does it mean to you?  Have you thought about what small changes you could make that might have a positive effect on your environment or on the planet as a whole?  Here are some ideas from The Independent though there is a lot of other information about.

So what do we do to be greener?

  • We have 30 solar panels on our office roof which give us FREE green electricity to run our office for most of the year… with energy to spare.
  • We DON’T print marketing material as we recognise that the majority of leaflets, brochures and flyers end up in the bin (or as litter)
  • We print the absolute minimum that we can in our office and recycle as much paper that we receive as we can.  Last year we took 80kg + to the recycling centre
  • In the office we boil the kettle at the beginning of the work day and fill a flask which keeps us in tea (usually) until home time
  • All of our laundry and the majority of our welcome pack shopping is done within 3 miles of the log cabins.  This cuts down on the miles AND benefits our local community
  • Things that we can’t buy locally we try to buy in bulk to avoid the need to drive
  • We maximise our use of digital communications to cut down on the need to drive
  • We don’t fill our accommodation with tourism leaflets which quickly become out of date or tatty.  We encourage our guests to plan their activities via the internet before they come.
  • We highlight to our guests businesses, attractions, activities and locations which are within 30 minutes drive of our accommodation.  Cutting down on the number of miles that they drive (cutting down their stress, the impact on our roads AND the impact on our environment) and encouraging spend in our local economy.
  • We encourage our guests to ride their bikes down to Coed y Brenin using the back lanes and tracks rather than driving the 2 miles.
  • We highlight greener activities to our guests – cycling, running and walking
  • Most of our cabins are now stained rather than being painted.  The stain lasts far longer than the paint used to do therefore reducing the impact on the environment.
  • There are now recycling facilities on site and we encourage guests to recycle all that they can.
  • We are beginning to fit devices to our heaters (4 cabins converted with the next one planned) which means that they only stay on for a fixed amount of time (up to 2 hours) before switching themselves off.  This means that guests can have the cabins as warm as they like when they are in the cabin BUT the on demand heaters can’t be left on when guests go out for the day.  Don’t panic… the storage heaters still provide background heating.
  • In most cabins water is heated when needed… we don’t have hot water tanks.
  • The light bulbs in our cabins are being changed for LED bulbs where possible to reduce their impact too.
  • Our cabins are fitted with up to date TVs which use less power.

If you would like help, advice or support with running YOUR self catering property in Anglesey or Gwynedd then please get in touch with me Sue Hall at 

To find out more about Cadair View Lodge accommodation in the heart of the Snowdonia National Park take a look at our website