Sue @ Cadair View Lodge's Blog

Tales from a self catering holiday provider


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There’s a little village…

… well you could hardly call it a village… a group of houses on a hillside, near to Bala and every year (if not at any other time of year) it becomes famous for being lit up by a man named Gareth.

He lights his house in Rhyd Uchaf with Christmas lights in aid of charity.  It’s a wonderful surprise, a delight for both children and adults, to drive up the pitch black road towards the Village and to see the brightly coloured lights shining out.

The Village (signposted Rhyd Uchaf) is off the A4212 not far out of Bala (a left hand turn – more of a fork).  Keep on this road for a mile or so – you can’t miss it!  Although it is possible to get there via “B” roads from the Trawsfynydd direction it is easier, quicker and safer (in the dark) to drive towards Bala on the “A” road and then to turn.

Here are some photos from a couple of years ago.  There seems to be more lights (if that’s possible) every year and remember to leave a donation.  You’ll probably find Gareth wandering around, talking to visitors.  Also please remember that this is his home and his garden and respect it as such… and please park considerately.

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See more information about our accommodation at www.CadairViewLodge.co.uk or send us an enquiry using the form below.

Hope to see you in Snowdonia soon.  Kindest regards Sue

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Frongoch… Birthplace of IRA?

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Not what you’d be expecting a holiday accommodation provider in Snowdonia to be talking about is it?  But it happened.

After the Easter Rising in 1916, around 1,800 people were transported from Ireland to a tiny village near to Bala.  Why there you may ask?  Well it seems that it was “out of the way” and there were already 2 established prisoner of war camps which had held German prisoners.  What it seems the authorities hadn’t realised (or realised the significance of) is that the area was a hotbed of Welsh nationalist feelings and behaviour.  These locals were working in the camps and the imprisoned Irish saw them as role models I suppose for what they could achieve.  The prisoners started to teach each other to speak Irish which made it more difficult for the prison authorities to understand what was going on.  It seems that they were allowed to “perform” dramas which involved drilling and military tactics.  When they returned to Ireland in the Christmas of 1916 as heroes they had formulated plans and I suppose they were what we’d call today radicalised.

Amongst the people at Frongoch were Michael Collins, a significant figure in the Irish Revolution and Sinn Féin founder, Arthur Griffith.

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This plaque was until recently the only reminder of the Frongoch Camps.

Until recently all that remained as a reminder of what happened in this little village was a plaque in a layby.  Since the Centenary commemorations an interpretation board and flags have joined it.  Stand in the layby and look at the board with an aerial photo of the area and try to imagine where this huge camp (and the whisky distillery which was there too) stood… it’s very hard.  It happened – honest, but it’s very difficult to imagine it now.

 

Frongoch is on  A4212 between Bala and Trawsfynydd.  The plaque is in layby, on left hand side after the Village on way towards Trawsfynydd.

BBC mark 100 years since arrival of Easter Rising prisonners

This is about 20 minutes drive from Cadair View Lodge log cabin accommodation

 

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The interpretation board showing where the camps where in relation to what can be seen at Frongoch today

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